Netflix's Sweet Tooth Review 

 
Sweet Tooth Review

During this covid time when there is not movie release on Big screen, Netflix came out as survival with some great releases this year. Now, Netflix releases another series with the name Sweet Tooth. This series is also based on a story similar to Corona, which spreads in the country and people get infected with search other. You might think this series was written after the Covid pandemic, but it's not true even before the arrival of Corona, Jeff Lemire had removed all the points of his comic series. Yes, after the outbreak of Corona, its formation definitely gained momentum. The series, which is going to be made for OTT Hulu in the year 2018, 'Ironman' fame Robert Downey Jr, along with his teammates, started making it for Netflix in April last year.

Sweet Tooth is a very interesting, emotional, and new meaning of relationships web series, 'Sweet Tooth'. Originally it was made in English only, but its dubbed version in Hindi has also become very good. The story also follows Dr. Singh (Adeel Akhtar), a doctor who is hiding a secret from his paranoid, cult-like neighborhood. The story is filled with interesting characters, from an “animal army” of wild kids (think Peter Pan’s Lost Boys) to Aimee (Dania Ramirez), who runs a preserve for surviving hybrids. However, the heartbeat of the story remains with the ever-hopeful Gus as he navigates a selfish populace in a world that wants him dead.

Also Read: In Pictures: Why is Sonam Kapoor a fashion icon?
Snapshot Taken from Sweet Tooth Trailer on YouTube
Snapshot Taken from Sweet Tooth Trailer on YouTube

This is one of the 'Series made for Children' which adults can also see and enjoy. The story also follows Dr. Singh (Adeel Akhtar), a doctor who is hiding a secret from his paranoid, cult-like neighborhood. The story is filled with interesting characters, from an “animal army” of wild kids (think Peter Pan’s Lost Boys) to Aimee (Dania Ramirez), who runs a preserve for surviving hybrids. However, the heartbeat of the story remains with the ever-hopeful Gus as he navigates a selfish populace in a world that wants him dead.

By the end of the pilot, you’ll know if this is a journey you’re able to go on. If you’re rolling your eyes and snorting, then Sweet Tooth just isn’t for you. If you keep going, it’s easy to warm to the growing ensemble and the different pieces of this world that are slowly being exposed. Anozie has the right world-weary exasperation and Owen the right spry rebelliousness that when they start bumping heads with each other, and with Convery’s endearing innocence, it’s a winning dynamic. Akhtar and Vellani’s storyline adds stakes and moral complications, while Ramirez adds her own shade of pluckiness.

Even though you know that eventually, the storylines will intersect, the back-and-forth parceling of the non-Gus plots isn’t always as smooth or considerate of overall momentum as it should be — though I was absolutely interested in it the supporting threads, which isn’t always the case.